Posts Tagged ‘Khalistan’

So, the book is getting around. Around the 30th anniversary of the attack on Golden Temple, Operation Blue Star, I received this review of my novel Roll of Honour from a US based Sikh website.

‘Sandhu’s story is full of shocking brutality, and definitely not for younger audiences. Unfortunately, so are many of the stories of 1984. For those who are willing to give this book a chance, however, Roll of Honour offers a lesson that readers are not likely to forget.’

Read more here

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This is what happens when you have been roaming the Dargahs and tombs of Sirhind and get late keeping your appointment with dear friend and contemporary intellectual from Punjab Daljit Ami. By way of penalty, he calls you to the studio and forces a brief interview on you. My first in Punjabi. Interview by Jaideep.

Please see here …

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7
Sep

On the Punjab Policeman’s Confession

   Posted by: aman    in Other

My piece in Tehelka on how the path of ethics in Punjab is not merely some abstract but is directly linked to progress through inflow of capital. A policeman has confessed to having killed 83 people without trial. Will the government(s) have the will to pursue this and other accounts by policeman and victims and seek closure to the violence in Punjab? Please read here …

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Friends, it is September 2013. Roll of Honour completes one year with us. In this year we collected over fifty reviews and interviews on Roll of Honour and some more on Sepia Leaves. Thank you so much for your love and support. I feel humbled and honoured. Please read all the pieces in the right panel under ‘Roll of Honour’.

This week Dr Charanjeet Kaur from the esteemed literary journal Muse India interviewed me on both my books and the writing life. Thank you Dr Kaur. Please read here …

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It is an honour to get such a glowing review in The Book Review. Thank you Nishat.

‘As the writer grapples with emotions of anger, fear, pain, suffering, confusion, chaos, resistance and endurance, the novel moves from poignant to contrived, disturbing to formulaic, profound to crude, literary to raw, lyrical to macabre and real to phoney. In short it leaves the reader as enraged, confused and silenced as its narrator is, opening up, in turn, several interpretive possibilities. … he narrates his personal experience of a political event, without pontificating or taking sides. It is through his unsullied account of what he witnessed and endured that the writer seeks to remember his dismembered self. Writing, in this sense, is also a survival strategy for the writer …This safe haven is also the space where the ‘performative’ reality of the nation is preserved, unadulterated by ideological hues, a space which the readers like birds must turn to, to find a trace of their history and hence a space that allows the literary writer a serendipitous entry into the social, historical and political debates.’

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Daman is a friend and a fellow writer but I did not know she was reviewing Roll of Honour in Asian Age.

‘Roll of Honour is an important work for it sets out to explore dark spaces in time and place and forbidden recesses of the mind. … Written as a fictionalised memoir, Roll of Honour is completely credible. While it may not answer all the questions that it raises, it certainly forces the reader to face them. These questions are both personal and political. Amandeep Sandhu has a remarkable command over the art of personal narrative. He writes with startling honesty and with searing intensity.’

Please read

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Varad Sharma highlights the tone of the book by selecting certain important instances of thought in his review. Thanks Varad.

‘Roll of Honour questions the authoritative power. It is about different identities an individual takes in different phases of life on the basis of colour, religion, community, language, and nation. The author is blunt in describing the events and the experiences (and even the abuses). … One should read this novel to get an insight about what the youth went through during troubled times in Punjab.’

Please read

The same review appeared at The New Indian Express

Read here

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27
Apr

The Reshmy Pillai Interview

   Posted by: aman    in Roll of Honour

I remain grateful to reviewers and interviewers who discern and glean out thoughts worthy of sharing in their pieces. After her excellent review Reshmy follows it up with this interview in which I manage to surprise myself. Read on.

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What does a writer say when a reviewer born in Bhopal in 1983 confesses that, ‘The eyes still haunt me and I am perpetually running away from certain realities in the embezzlement of fiction that may touch base human emotions but doesn’t touch human suffering at the hands of fellow countrymen. … When Amandeep Sandhu asked me to read his second book for my views as a reader I knew if I say a yes, it would be my test too. A test if the adventurous reader has the guts too.’

Then she says this on the book. I feel humbled. Please read …

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10
Apr

An Interview on Male CSA

   Posted by: aman    in Roll of Honour

Friends, last December I was surprised by the cold wave in Calcutta. That is when, through Julia Dutta, I met Dipali Taneja. I was hungry, blown by the cold. The evening conversation with excellent kebabs and continental food at Dipali’s gave me strength and I came away knowing I had made a new friend.

This is the Child Sexual Abuse Awareness month and suddenly Dipali asked me for an interview. I just now got the blog entry from her and am so pleased to see how she read Roll of Honour and has structured her entry. Over the past few months many readers have brought such a variety of readings to the book, Dipali sees it as a book against child sex abuse and I feel so satisfied that she sees it like that. Towards the end of the interview I have made a request to all of us readers. Read on… Thank you Dipali.

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